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Directorate for Management

  • Additional IG Designated as Members of CIGIE’s Pandemic Response Accountability Committee

    For Information Contact

    Public Affairs (202) 254-4100

    For Immediate Release

    Download PDF (185.17 KB)

    IGs to Join Committee Coordinating Oversight of Federal Funds Used for Coronavirus Response

    Michael E. Horowitz, Chair of the Council of the Inspectors General on Integrity and Efficiency 
    (CIGIE), and Glenn A. Fine, Chair of CIGIE’s Pandemic Response Accountability Committee (PRAC), 
    announced today additional Inspectors General (IG) to serve as members of the PRAC. The new members 
    are:

    •   Mitchell L. Behm, Acting Inspector General, Department of Transportation
    •   Mark Bialek, Inspector General, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System
    •   Kathy A. Buller, Inspector General, Peace Corps
    •   Rae Oliver Davis, Inspector General, Department of Housing and Urban Development
    •   Phyllis K. Fong, Inspector General, Department of Agriculture
    •   Susan S. Gibson, Inspector General, National Reconnaissance Office
    •   Allison C. Lerner, Inspector General, National Science Foundation
    •   Jay N. Lerner, Inspector General, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
    •   Paul K. Martin, Inspector General, National Aeronautics and Space Administration
    •   Michael J. Missal, Inspector General, Department of Veterans Affairs
    •   Tammy L. Whitcomb, Inspector General, U.S. Postal Service
    •   Special Inspector General for Pandemic Oversight (when nominated by the President and confirmed 
    by the Senate)

    In addition, Inspector General Martin was named as the Committee’s Vice Chair. Mr. Martin has 
    served as Inspector General at NASA for the past 10 years and prior to that served at the 
    Department of Justice Office of the Inspector General for 12 years, the last 7 as Deputy Inspector 
    General.

    These Inspectors General, who were designated as members of the PRAC pursuant to Section 15010 of 
    the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (“CARES Act”), oversee agencies that will 
    disburse funds made available under the CARES Act or are otherwise involved in the Coronavirus 
    response.

    Today’s designated Inspectors General join the PRAC alongside Mr. Fine and 8 other Inspectors
    General specifically identified as PRAC members by the CARES Act:

    •   Sandra D. Bruce, Acting Inspector General, Department of Education
    •   Joseph V. Cuffari, Inspector General, Department of Homeland Security
    •   Scott S. Dahl, Inspector General, Department of Labor
    •   Richard K. Delmar, Acting Inspector General, Department of the Treasury
    •   J. Russell George, Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration
    •   Christi A. Grimm, Acting Inspector General, Department of Health and Human Services
    •   Michael E. Horowitz, Inspector General, Department of Justice
    •   Hannibal “Mike” Ware, Inspector General, Small Business Administration

    Consistent with the CARES Act, all Inspectors General serving on the Committee will continue to 
    perform their Inspector General duties.

    “This additional group of Inspectors General brings a wide range of expertise to the Committee. 
    Working closely with all 75 Federal Inspectors General, the Committee will seek to ensure that the 
    funds intended to support individuals, workers, healthcare professionals, businesses and others 
    affected by the pandemic are used efficiently, effectively, and in accordance with the law,” said 
    PRAC Chair Fine.

    The CARES Act provides over $2 trillion in emergency federal spending to address the economic 
    impacts of the coronavirus pandemic, and establishes the PRAC and several other oversight 
    mechanisms to prevent waste, fraud, and abuse in the use of these funds.

    The PRAC will promote transparency and support independent oversight of the funds provided by the 
    CARES Act and two prior emergency spending bills, the Coronavirus Preparedness and Response 
    Supplemental Appropriations Act and the Families First Coronavirus Response Act. In addition to its 
    oversight responsibilities, the PRAC is tasked with supporting efforts to “prevent and detect 
    fraud, waste, abuse, and mismanagement [and] mitigate major risks that cut across program and 
    agency boundaries.”

    ###

    CIGIE is an independent entity established within the executive branch by the Inspector General Act 
    and includes 75 statutorily created federal Inspectors General. Its mission is to address 
    integrity, economy, and effectiveness issues that transcend individual government agencies and to 
    aid in the establishment of a well-trained and highly skilled workforce in the Offices of the 
    Inspectors General. For more information about CIGIE and the Inspector General community, please 
    visit https://www.ignet.gov/. To find and read reports from the federal Ins  ectors
    General, please visit https://oversight.gov and follow @OversightGov on Twitter.

    If you have additional questions, please contact:

    Dwrena Allen
    DOD OIG Spokesperson
    dwrena.allen@dodig.mil

    Stephanie Logan
    DOJ OIG/CIGIE Spokesperson
    Stephanie.logan@usdoj.gov

    Alan Boehm
    CIGIE Executive Director
    alan.boehm@cigie.gov

    DHS Agency
    Oversight Area
  • PALMS Funding and Payments Did Not Comply with Federal Appropriations Law

    Executive Summary

    DHS’ funding and payments for PALMS violated Federal appropriations law.  Specifically, DHS violated the bona fide needs rule in using fiscal year (FY) 2011 component funds in FYs 2012 and 2013 for e-Training services and PALMS implementation respectively, when the funds were not legally available for those needs.  As a result of the bona fide needs rule and purpose statute violations, DHS may also have violated the Antideficiency Act in FYs 2013 – 2015 when the Department augmented appropriations for the Human Resources Information Technology program with component funds. We made nine recommendations to address violations of Federal appropriations law and to improve controls to prevent such potential violations in the future.

    Report Number
    OIG-20-19
    Issue Date
    Document File
    DHS Agency
    Oversight Area
    Fiscal Year
    2020
  • United States Secret Service Expenses Incurred at Trump Turnberry Resort

    Executive Summary

    The U.S. Secret Service incurred operational and temporary duty costs for rental cars, hotel rooms, meals and incidentals, overtime pay, commercial airfare, golf cart rentals, and other logistical support.  Certain details of the cost information related to the Secret Service’s protective operations presented in the report are designated as Law Enforcement Sensitive.  We did not include salaries and benefits for government personnel traveling with the President because the Secret Service would have incurred these costs regardless of whether the President traveled.  Also excluded are costs associated with assistance provided by the Department of Defense, such as the use of military aircraft to transport personnel and equipment, because the Secret Service is not required to reimburse these costs.  We did not identify any fraud indicators or unauthorized costs.  We made no recommendations. 

    Report Number
    OIG-20-18
    Issue Date
    Document File
    DHS Agency
    Oversight Area
    Fiscal Year
    2020
  • Former Acting Inspector General for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security Indicted on Theft of Government Property and Scheme to Defraud the United States Government

    For Information Contact

    Public Affairs (202) 254-4100

    For Immediate Release

    Download PDF (84.94 KB)

    A federal grand jury in the District of Columbia returned a 16-count indictment against a former Acting Inspector General for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and a former subordinate for their alleged theft of proprietary software and confidential databases from the U.S. government as part of a scheme to defraud the U.S. government.

    Assistant Attorney General Brian A. Benczkowski of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division, U.S. Attorney Timothy J. Shea for the District of Columbia, DHS Inspector General Joseph V. Cuffari and Inspector General Tammy L. Whitcomb for the U.S. Postal Service (USPS) made the announcement.

    The indictment charges Charles K. Edwards, 59, of Sandy Spring, Maryland, and Murali Yamazula Venkata, 54, of Aldie, Virginia, with conspiracy to commit theft of government property and to defraud the United States, theft of government property, wire fraud, and aggravated identity theft.  The indictment also charges Venkata with destruction of records.

    According to the allegations in the indictment, from October 2014 to April 2017, Edwards, Venkata, and others executed a scheme to defraud the U.S. government by stealing confidential and proprietary software from DHS Office of Inspector General (OIG), along with sensitive government databases containing personal identifying information (PII) of DHS and USPS employees, so that Edwards’s company, Delta Business Solutions, could later sell an enhanced version of DHS-OIG’s software to the Office of Inspector General for the U.S. Department of Agriculture at a profit.  Although Edwards had left DHS-OIG in December 2013, he continued to leverage his relationship with Venkata and other DHS-OIG employees to steal the software and the sensitive government databases.

    The indictment further alleges that, in addition to stealing DHS-OIG’s software and the sensitive government databases, Venkata and others also assisted Edwards by reconfiguring his laptop so that he could properly upload the stolen software and databases, provided troubleshooting support whenever Edwards required it, and helped him build a testing server at his residence with the stolen software and databases, which contained PII.  As further part of the alleged scheme, Edwards retained software developers in India for the purpose of developing his commercial alternative of DHS-OIG’s software.

    The indictment is the result of an ongoing investigation by DHS-OIG and USPS-OIG and is being prosecuted by Trial Attorney Victor R. Salgado of the Criminal Division’s Public Integrity Section and Assistant U.S. Attorney David B. Kent of the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Columbia.

    An indictment is merely an allegation and all defendants are presumed innocent until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law.

    The year 2020 marks the 150th anniversary of the Department of Justice.  Learn more about the history of our agency at www.Justice.gov/Celebrating150Years.

    DHS Agency
    Oversight Area
  • Fraud Alert: DHS OIG Participates in National “Slam the Scam” day

    For Information Contact

    Public Affairs (202) 981-6000

    For Immediate Release

    Download PDF (159.37 KB)

    The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Office of Inspector General (OIG) joins the Social Security Administration (SSA) OIG and other Federal agencies on March 5, 2020 for National “Slam the Scam” Day, to raise public awareness of government imposter telephone scams across the United States.

    SSA OIG is engaging other Federal agencies and the private sector to promote a National “Slam the Scam Day” as a National Consumer Protection Week initiative.  On March 5, SSA will participate in a USA.gov-hosted Twitter chat, and a Facebook Live event at Social Security.

    Both DHS OIG and SSA OIG would like to warn all Americans to hang up on all government imposters, and ask them to spread the word to family and friends.  These pervasive scams—in which callers pretend to be government employees to mislead victims into providing personal information or making payments—have become a scourge on the American public.  The Federal Trade Commission recently reported victims lost nearly $153 million to government imposter scams last year.

    DHS telephone numbers have been used in the past as part of a telephone spoofing scam targeting individuals throughout the country.  Spoofing is the deliberate falsifying of information transmitted to a caller ID display to disguise an identity.  The perpetrators of the DHS-related scam represent themselves as employees with “U.S. Immigration” or other government entities.  They alter caller ID systems to make it appear that the call is coming from the DHS HQ Operator number (202-282-8000) or the DHS Civil Rights and Civil Liberties (CRCL) number (202-401-1474).  The scammers obtain or verify personally identifiable information from their victims through various tactics, including by telling individuals that they are the victims of identity theft.  The scammers also pose as law enforcement or immigration officials and threaten victims with arrest unless they make payments to the scammers using a variety of methods.  The scammers have also emailed victims from email addresses ending in “uscis.org.”  Many of the scammers reportedly have pronounced accents.

    As a reminder, DHS never uses its HQ Operator or CRCL number to make outgoing calls of this nature. Individuals receiving phone calls from these numbers should not provide any personal information.  It continues to be perfectly safe to place calls to the DHS HQ Operator and CRCL numbers and DHS officials may continue to be contacted by dialing the DHS HQ Operator number.

    DHS OIG takes these matters very seriously.  Anyone who believes they may have been a victim of this telephone spoofing scam is urged to call the DHS OIG Hotline (1-800-323-8603) or file a complaint online via the DHS OIG website www.oig.dhs.gov.  You may also contact the Federal Trade Commission to file a complaint and/or report identity theft

    For more information regarding SSA OIG’s National “Slam the Scam” day activity you can visit SSA OIG

    For more information visit our website, www.oig.dhs.gov

    DHS Agency
    Oversight Area
  • DHS Confirmed It Has Applied Lessons Learned in the Latest Financial System Modernization Effort

    Executive Summary

    DHS developed a strategy to apply 29 lessons learned from prior system updates to the current Financial Systems Modernization (FSM) TRIO program. Since DHS’ actions provides a positive outlook on the future progress of the FSM TRIO project we made no recommendations for improvement.  The report’s limited objective and scope does not provide a complete assessment DHS’ efforts to incorporate lessons learned into their recently reinvigorated FSM efforts. 

    Report Number
    OIG-20-09
    Issue Date
    Document File
    DHS Agency
    Oversight Area
    Fiscal Year
    2020
  • CBP, ICE, TSA, and Secret Service Have Taken Steps to Address Illegal and Prescription Opioid Use

    Executive Summary

    From fiscal years 2015 through 2018, in the midst of a growing opioid epidemic, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Transportation Security Administration, and U.S. Secret Service appropriately disciplined employees whose drug test results indicated illegal opioid use, based on their employee standards of conduct and tables of offenses and penalties.  Additionally, during the same time period, components have either implemented or are taking steps to evaluate whether employees using prescription opioids can effectively conduct their duties.  For example, components have established policies prohibiting the use of prescription opioids that may impact an employee’s ability to work, in addition to requiring employees to report such prescription opioid use.  They have also implemented or are in the process of implementing measures to evaluate the fitness for duty of employees using prescription opioids.  These policies establish consistent standards components can use to ensure they are allowing employees to use legally-prescribed opioids, while also ensuring their workforce is capable of effectively performing their duties.  We made two recommendations to improve components’ oversight of illegal and prescription opioid use by employees.  CBP and Secret Service concurred with the recommendations, which are both resolved and open.

    Report Number
    OIG-20-05
    Issue Date
    Document File
    DHS Agency
    Oversight Area
    Fiscal Year
    2020
  • Independent Auditors' Report on DHS' FY 2019 Financial Statements and Internal Control over Financial Reporting

    Executive Summary

    KPMG LLP (KPMG), under contract with DHS OIG, conducted an integrated audit of DHS’ FY 2019 consolidated financial statements and internal control over financial reporting.  KPMG issued an unmodified (clean) opinion over the Department’s financial statements, reporting that they present fairly, in all material respects, DHS’ financial position as of September 30, 2019.  However, KPMG identified material weaknesses in internal control in two areas and other significant deficiencies in three areas.  Consequently, KPMG issued an adverse opinion on DHS’ internal control over financial reporting.  KPMG also reported two instances of noncompliance with laws and regulations.  DHS concurred with all of the recommendations.

    Report Number
    OIG-20-03
    Issue Date
    Document File
    DHS Agency
    Oversight Area
    Fiscal Year
    2020
  • Evaluation of DHS' Information Security Program for Fiscal Year 2018

    Executive Summary

    DHS’ information security program was effective for fiscal year 2018 because the Department earned the targeted maturity rating, “Managed and Measurable” (Level 4) in four of five functions, as compared to last year’s lower overall rating, “Consistently Implemented” (Level 3). We attributed DHS’ progress to improvements in information security risk, configuration management practices, continuous monitoring, and more effective security training. By addressing the remaining deficiencies, DHS can further improve its security program ensuring its systems adequately protect the critical and sensitive data they store and process.

    Report Number
    OIG-19-60
    Issue Date
    Document File
    DHS Agency
    Oversight Area
    Fiscal Year
    2019
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