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Management

  • Additional IG Designated as Members of CIGIE’s Pandemic Response Accountability Committee

    For Information Contact

    Public Affairs (202) 254-4100

    For Immediate Release

    Download PDF (185.17 KB)

    IGs to Join Committee Coordinating Oversight of Federal Funds Used for Coronavirus Response

    Michael E. Horowitz, Chair of the Council of the Inspectors General on Integrity and Efficiency 
    (CIGIE), and Glenn A. Fine, Chair of CIGIE’s Pandemic Response Accountability Committee (PRAC), 
    announced today additional Inspectors General (IG) to serve as members of the PRAC. The new members 
    are:

    •   Mitchell L. Behm, Acting Inspector General, Department of Transportation
    •   Mark Bialek, Inspector General, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System
    •   Kathy A. Buller, Inspector General, Peace Corps
    •   Rae Oliver Davis, Inspector General, Department of Housing and Urban Development
    •   Phyllis K. Fong, Inspector General, Department of Agriculture
    •   Susan S. Gibson, Inspector General, National Reconnaissance Office
    •   Allison C. Lerner, Inspector General, National Science Foundation
    •   Jay N. Lerner, Inspector General, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
    •   Paul K. Martin, Inspector General, National Aeronautics and Space Administration
    •   Michael J. Missal, Inspector General, Department of Veterans Affairs
    •   Tammy L. Whitcomb, Inspector General, U.S. Postal Service
    •   Special Inspector General for Pandemic Oversight (when nominated by the President and confirmed 
    by the Senate)

    In addition, Inspector General Martin was named as the Committee’s Vice Chair. Mr. Martin has 
    served as Inspector General at NASA for the past 10 years and prior to that served at the 
    Department of Justice Office of the Inspector General for 12 years, the last 7 as Deputy Inspector 
    General.

    These Inspectors General, who were designated as members of the PRAC pursuant to Section 15010 of 
    the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (“CARES Act”), oversee agencies that will 
    disburse funds made available under the CARES Act or are otherwise involved in the Coronavirus 
    response.

    Today’s designated Inspectors General join the PRAC alongside Mr. Fine and 8 other Inspectors
    General specifically identified as PRAC members by the CARES Act:

    •   Sandra D. Bruce, Acting Inspector General, Department of Education
    •   Joseph V. Cuffari, Inspector General, Department of Homeland Security
    •   Scott S. Dahl, Inspector General, Department of Labor
    •   Richard K. Delmar, Acting Inspector General, Department of the Treasury
    •   J. Russell George, Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration
    •   Christi A. Grimm, Acting Inspector General, Department of Health and Human Services
    •   Michael E. Horowitz, Inspector General, Department of Justice
    •   Hannibal “Mike” Ware, Inspector General, Small Business Administration

    Consistent with the CARES Act, all Inspectors General serving on the Committee will continue to 
    perform their Inspector General duties.

    “This additional group of Inspectors General brings a wide range of expertise to the Committee. 
    Working closely with all 75 Federal Inspectors General, the Committee will seek to ensure that the 
    funds intended to support individuals, workers, healthcare professionals, businesses and others 
    affected by the pandemic are used efficiently, effectively, and in accordance with the law,” said 
    PRAC Chair Fine.

    The CARES Act provides over $2 trillion in emergency federal spending to address the economic 
    impacts of the coronavirus pandemic, and establishes the PRAC and several other oversight 
    mechanisms to prevent waste, fraud, and abuse in the use of these funds.

    The PRAC will promote transparency and support independent oversight of the funds provided by the 
    CARES Act and two prior emergency spending bills, the Coronavirus Preparedness and Response 
    Supplemental Appropriations Act and the Families First Coronavirus Response Act. In addition to its 
    oversight responsibilities, the PRAC is tasked with supporting efforts to “prevent and detect 
    fraud, waste, abuse, and mismanagement [and] mitigate major risks that cut across program and 
    agency boundaries.”

    ###

    CIGIE is an independent entity established within the executive branch by the Inspector General Act 
    and includes 75 statutorily created federal Inspectors General. Its mission is to address 
    integrity, economy, and effectiveness issues that transcend individual government agencies and to 
    aid in the establishment of a well-trained and highly skilled workforce in the Offices of the 
    Inspectors General. For more information about CIGIE and the Inspector General community, please 
    visit https://www.ignet.gov/. To find and read reports from the federal Ins  ectors
    General, please visit https://oversight.gov and follow @OversightGov on Twitter.

    If you have additional questions, please contact:

    Dwrena Allen
    DOD OIG Spokesperson
    dwrena.allen@dodig.mil

    Stephanie Logan
    DOJ OIG/CIGIE Spokesperson
    Stephanie.logan@usdoj.gov

    Alan Boehm
    CIGIE Executive Director
    alan.boehm@cigie.gov

    DHS Agency
    Oversight Area
  • PALMS Funding and Payments Did Not Comply with Federal Appropriations Law

    Executive Summary

    DHS’ funding and payments for PALMS violated Federal appropriations law.  Specifically, DHS violated the bona fide needs rule in using fiscal year (FY) 2011 component funds in FYs 2012 and 2013 for e-Training services and PALMS implementation respectively, when the funds were not legally available for those needs.  As a result of the bona fide needs rule and purpose statute violations, DHS may also have violated the Antideficiency Act in FYs 2013 – 2015 when the Department augmented appropriations for the Human Resources Information Technology program with component funds. We made nine recommendations to address violations of Federal appropriations law and to improve controls to prevent such potential violations in the future.

    Report Number
    OIG-20-19
    Issue Date
    Document File
    DHS Agency
    Oversight Area
    Fiscal Year
    2020
  • United States Secret Service Expenses Incurred at Trump Turnberry Resort

    Executive Summary

    The U.S. Secret Service incurred operational and temporary duty costs for rental cars, hotel rooms, meals and incidentals, overtime pay, commercial airfare, golf cart rentals, and other logistical support.  Certain details of the cost information related to the Secret Service’s protective operations presented in the report are designated as Law Enforcement Sensitive.  We did not include salaries and benefits for government personnel traveling with the President because the Secret Service would have incurred these costs regardless of whether the President traveled.  Also excluded are costs associated with assistance provided by the Department of Defense, such as the use of military aircraft to transport personnel and equipment, because the Secret Service is not required to reimburse these costs.  We did not identify any fraud indicators or unauthorized costs.  We made no recommendations. 

    Report Number
    OIG-20-18
    Issue Date
    Document File
    DHS Agency
    Oversight Area
    Fiscal Year
    2020
  • DHS Confirmed It Has Applied Lessons Learned in the Latest Financial System Modernization Effort

    Executive Summary

    DHS developed a strategy to apply 29 lessons learned from prior system updates to the current Financial Systems Modernization (FSM) TRIO program. Since DHS’ actions provides a positive outlook on the future progress of the FSM TRIO project we made no recommendations for improvement.  The report’s limited objective and scope does not provide a complete assessment DHS’ efforts to incorporate lessons learned into their recently reinvigorated FSM efforts. 

    Report Number
    OIG-20-09
    Issue Date
    Document File
    DHS Agency
    Oversight Area
    Fiscal Year
    2020
  • Audit of DHS Fiscal Year 2017 Purchase and Travel Card Programs

    Executive Summary

    Except for identified questioned costs, reported DHS Purchase and Travel Card transactions for FY 2017 were appropriate and complied with relevant laws and regulations.  The auditor, CohnReznick LLP, identified 17 control deficiencies within DHS Purchase and Travel Card Programs related to maintenance of purchase documentation, application of required procurement policies, price reasonableness determinations, price quotes/competitive bids, required sourcing, tax exemptions, and split purchases.  The DHS Travel Card Program deficiencies related to maintenance of travel documentation, allowability of transactions per regulations, credit balance refunds, the prudent traveler standard, and improper use of a travel card.  The auditor identified $43,508 in questioned costs for FY 2017 and made 12 recommendations.  When implemented, these recommendations should ensure that Purchase and Travel Card transactions are appropriate and comply with relevant laws and regulations.  The Office of the Chief Financial Officer concurred with six recommendations and non-concurred with six recommendations. 

    Report Number
    OIG-20-04
    Issue Date
    Document File
    Oversight Area
    Fiscal Year
    2020
  • CBP, ICE, TSA, and Secret Service Have Taken Steps to Address Illegal and Prescription Opioid Use

    Executive Summary

    From fiscal years 2015 through 2018, in the midst of a growing opioid epidemic, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Transportation Security Administration, and U.S. Secret Service appropriately disciplined employees whose drug test results indicated illegal opioid use, based on their employee standards of conduct and tables of offenses and penalties.  Additionally, during the same time period, components have either implemented or are taking steps to evaluate whether employees using prescription opioids can effectively conduct their duties.  For example, components have established policies prohibiting the use of prescription opioids that may impact an employee’s ability to work, in addition to requiring employees to report such prescription opioid use.  They have also implemented or are in the process of implementing measures to evaluate the fitness for duty of employees using prescription opioids.  These policies establish consistent standards components can use to ensure they are allowing employees to use legally-prescribed opioids, while also ensuring their workforce is capable of effectively performing their duties.  We made two recommendations to improve components’ oversight of illegal and prescription opioid use by employees.  CBP and Secret Service concurred with the recommendations, which are both resolved and open.

    Report Number
    OIG-20-05
    Issue Date
    Document File
    DHS Agency
    Oversight Area
    Fiscal Year
    2020
  • Independent Auditors' Report on DHS' FY 2019 Financial Statements and Internal Control over Financial Reporting

    Executive Summary

    KPMG LLP (KPMG), under contract with DHS OIG, conducted an integrated audit of DHS’ FY 2019 consolidated financial statements and internal control over financial reporting.  KPMG issued an unmodified (clean) opinion over the Department’s financial statements, reporting that they present fairly, in all material respects, DHS’ financial position as of September 30, 2019.  However, KPMG identified material weaknesses in internal control in two areas and other significant deficiencies in three areas.  Consequently, KPMG issued an adverse opinion on DHS’ internal control over financial reporting.  KPMG also reported two instances of noncompliance with laws and regulations.  DHS concurred with all of the recommendations.

    Report Number
    OIG-20-03
    Issue Date
    Document File
    DHS Agency
    Oversight Area
    Fiscal Year
    2020
  • S&T Is Not Effectively Coordinating Research and Development Efforts across DHS

    Executive Summary

    We determined that despite requirements of the Homeland Security Act of 2002, as amended, the Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) did not effectively coordinate and integrate department-wide research and development (R&D) activities.  In August 2015, S&T established Integrated Product Teams (IPTs) as the central mechanism to identify, track, and coordinate department-wide priority R&D efforts.  However, S&T did not follow its IPT process as intended.  Specifically, not all components submitted all information on capability gaps to the IPTs; S&T did not effectively gather, track, and manage data on the Department’s R&D gaps and activities; and S&T did not adequately monitor the IPT process to ensure it was effective.  As a result, S&T may not be able to provide the Secretary of Homeland Security and Congress with an accurate profile of the Department’s R&D activities or justify funding needs for a wide range of missions, including securing the border, detecting nuclear devices, and screening airline passengers.  We made three recommendations to improve S&T’s coordination of R&D activities across DHS.  S&T concurred with our recommendations.

    Report Number
    OIG-19-59
    Issue Date
    Document File
    DHS Agency
    Oversight Area
    Fiscal Year
    2019
  • DHS OIG Commemorates National Whistleblower Appreciation Day

    For Information Contact

    Public Affairs (202) 981-6000

    For Immediate Release

    Download PDF (87.25 KB)

    Today, agencies across the federal government will commemorate National Whistleblower Appreciation Day. This day memorializes those individuals, from as early as the American Revolutionary War, who have had the courage to speak up and hold our government accountable to its fundamental values.

    The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Office of Inspector General (OIG) relies on whistleblowers to report waste, fraud, and abuse in DHS programs and operations. This effort is led in part by OIG’s Whistleblower Protection Coordinator who is responsible for educating and advising all DHS employees about whistleblower protection rights and remedies.  Additionally, DHS OIG’s Whistleblower Protection Unit, responsible for handling all allegations of whistleblower retaliation filed with the OIG, has reviewed 184 retaliation complaints during the first half of fiscal year 2019.

    “Today, we recognize the vital contributions of the whistleblowers who have and will continue to shape our democracy by ‘blowing the whistle’”, said Deputy Inspector General Jennifer Costello.  

    Individuals who are aware of fraud, waste, abuse or mismanagement of DHS resources are encouraged to contact OIG via OIG’s Hotline or by calling (800) 323-8603. Whistleblowers can choose to remain anonymous when reporting to the OIG and the OIG Whistleblower Protection Coordinator is always available to provide general information to DHS employees and contractors on whistleblower rights and protections.

    DHS Agency
    Oversight Area
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