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New Orleans

  • Summary and Key Findings of Fiscal Year 2017 FEMA Disaster Grant and Program Audits

    Executive Summary

    Collectively, our FY 2017 work shows that FEMA continues to face systemic problems and operational challenges, as the variety of findings summarized in this report illustrates In FY 2017, FEMA did not manage disaster relief grants and funds adequately and did not hold grant recipients accountable for properly managing disaster relief funds. We continue to identify problems such as improper contract costs, and ineligible and unsupported expenditures.

    In FY 2017, we identified $2.08 billion in questioned costs, which represents 96 percent of the $2.16 billion audited.2 We issued 37 reports concerning FEMA grants, programs, and operations funded by the DRF. Specifically, we conducted 16 grant audits, 13 proactive audits, and 8 program audits. In the last 9 fiscal years, we audited grant funds totaling $13.75 billion and reported potential monetary benefits of $6.55 billion.

    Report Number
    OIG-18-75
    Issue Date
    Document File
    DHS Agency
    Oversight Area
    Fiscal Year
    2018
  • FEMA Should Disallow $2.04 Billion Approved for New Orleans Infrastructure Repairs

    Executive Summary

    We determined that FEMA did not have sufficient evidence to support its decision that Hurricanes Katrina and Rita directly caused damages to the roads and water distribution system.  The demonstration of direct cause is necessary for work to be considered eligible for Federal disaster assistance funding, as required by the Stafford Act and FEMA’s own policies.  As a result, FEMA should not have awarded the initial $785 million, or the additional $1.25 billion to complete the repairs.  We recommended that FEMA disallow $2.04 billion in questioned costs —the initial award of $785 million, plus the additional $1.25 billion award.  We made two recommendations and FEMA non-concurred with both of our recommendations.

    Report Number
    OIG-17-97-D
    Issue Date
    Document File
    DHS Agency
    Oversight Area
    Fiscal Year
    2017
  • Roman Catholic Church of the Archdiocese of New Orleans 

    Executive Summary

    The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New Orleans is a division of the Roman Catholic Church and is the second-oldest diocese in the United States. The Archdiocese encompasses 8 civil parishes in the New Orleans metropolitan area arid includes 108 church parishes. In addition to the religious facilities of each church parish, the Archdiocese also owns primarily non-religious facilities including school buildings, elderly and disabled persons housing, and charitable assistance buildings. Hurricane Katrina's high winds and flooding caused extensive damage to many of the Archdiocese's primarily non-religious buildings. The Archdiocese accounted for disaster costs on a project-by-project basis, as required. However, the Archdiocese did not always follow federal procurement standards, arid its claim included $520,952 in ineligible costs for markups on contract costs ($510,328) and costs not incurred ($10,624).

    Report Number
    DD-10-18
    Issue Date
    Document File
    DHS Agency
    Oversight Area
    Fiscal Year
    2010
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